• Home
  • |
  • 10 Types of Campfires Preppers Need to Know

 June 29

by Carolina

by Nicky Case

There are a ton of tips, hacks and “brain dumps” for survivalists out there. Most are either silly or ineffective. However, one thing that most preppers seem to get right is knowing how to make a fire.

In addition to burning “environmentally toxic” wood like trees and bark, I’ve found that campfires also have some very useful uses. These uses can be used for many purposes in a survival situation.

For one, it can help keep your water tanks and air supply from running out if your camp was suddenly attacked by marauding looters.

It also makes a good way to cook food over a fire.

Here are 10 types of campfires and some examples of how you can use them in your survival situation.

Dirt Campfires

Did you know that dirt campfires are the easiest, fastest and least environmentally toxic ways to start a fire?

This is something you should know before you come back from a survival vacation or plan a camping trip. It might take some digging to find a bunch of dirt that’s not polluted, but once you find it, it is worth it.

Dust particles from your car, trailer, tires and air system will eventually get sucked up into your engine, causing it to overheat. When the temperature rises and starts burning through the engine and the coolant coolant in your cooling system, you’ll know it’s time to put out your fire and hit the road.

Once you’ve got a small amount of dirt, you can scatter it in a ring around a couple of small sticks, kindling and a candle. In an emergency situation, these dirt fires will provide enough heat to re-light your candles while also getting the fire started for a larger fire.

Manuatian Fires

A manuatian fire is like a naturally occurring fire using nothing but the material in your immediate surroundings. They are almost always quite small, about the size of a matchbox. They are pretty much always found near wooded areas and where you can build a fire away from any flammable materials.

Each individual manuatian fire is known as a “manu-glow”.

When used properly, a manu-glow will burn for about five hours. However, the flames can get out of control pretty quickly if it gets too dry or windy.

According to Survival Book, the best way to use manuatian fires is to bury them in the ground.

Simply build a “pile” of dirt, set the fire inside it, bury it again, cover with the dirt, close the hole and leave it to burn all night. When you awaken in the morning, you’ll have a blaze with just enough residual heat to make coffee.

Eco-Friendly Campfires

A hybrid of a manuatian fire and a standard fire, the eco-friendly fire works as both a manuatian fire and a normal fire. The trick is to light it up and then let it die down. That’s because if you’re going to be using the fire for a few hours, you’ll want to leave it to burn out, burning slower than it would if you were starting a normal fire.

The main difference between a regular fire and an eco-friendly fire is that an eco-friendly fire is less susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning. In fact, the material needed to make an eco-friendly fire can be found all over the forest, which makes them very easy to make.

A hybrid of a manuatian fire and a standard fire, the eco-friendly fire works as both a manuatian fire and a normal fire. The trick is to light it up and then let it die down. That’s because if you’re going to be using the fire for a few hours, you’ll want to leave it to burn out, burning slower than it would if you were starting a normal fire.

The main difference between a regular fire and an eco-friendly fire is that an eco-friendly fire is less susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning. In fact, the material needed to make an eco-friendly fire can be found all over the forest, which makes them very easy to make.

Buckets Fire Rings

Instead of using a metal ring, make your own fire ring with plastic pipe. Once you’ve got the rings ready, you just have to start a small fire, set the ring on top of the fire and walk away.

When you come back to your fire ring, you’ll find the dirt has been heated up and absorbed the heat from the fire, all without it burning you. You’ll end up with a fire ring made of only dirt.

Buckets Fire Rings

share this

Related Posts

Why celebrities are calling for a ‘gadget tax’ – The Week UK

Photos of the best celebrities in 2021 | Gallery – Texas News Today

Food Network Celebrities We Have Already Lost – Illinoisnewstoday.com